Hey now, hey now, my bunting’s back. Again.

12 05 2013

 

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Banksy, ‘Slave Labour (Bunting Boy)’

So it appears Banksy’s troublesome wall mural will appear at auction yet again, having been withdrawn from sale in the US earlier in the year (if you’re curious, you can read more about that here) … and yet again, I ask – was Banksy involved in the ‘restoration’ of the previously absent bunting, and if not, will the auction house make note of their handiwork in their catalogue entry?

What do you reckon the odds are? Somewhere between Buckley’s and none I’ll wager.

 

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Have you been missing me?

9 05 2013
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Guido Reni, ‘The Penitent St Peter’.

Sincere apologies.

It’s been very, very busy.

In a good way.

My inactivity is unforgivable. As a small offering to compensate for my absence, here’s a link to a feature article I wrote on the market in Aboriginal art for The Age on the weekend…. click here.  





Who knew pending nuclear apocalypse could be so melodic?

12 04 2013

All visual artists were officially put on notice earlier today (see previous post).

As for you musicians? Don’t get too smug. They’re gunning for you too.





Art in the Headlines

12 04 2013
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Jackson Pollock, ‘The Key’, 1946 (via ibiblio.org).

Ah, Jackson Pollock.

What’s that, you say? Your two-year-old could have done that?

Well, perhaps you’re right… from The Age … 

‘Toddler young at art but showing a maturity to turn a profit.’ **

To all you jaded and mature-age art practitioners… meet what is described in reporter Matthew Dunn’s article as “art in its purest form, untouched by life’s pollutants and representative of what is important and beautiful”. Art made by a two-year-old. There’s your problem. You’re all far too polluted.

So there you go.

** ‘Young at art’. Love it. Those puns just pen themselves.





Copyright or wrong?

10 04 2013
china-copyright-Capotondi

On the left: Claudio Capotondi, ‘Sferosnodo’, 1983. On the right: copy of ‘Sferosnodo’ outside Kunshan station, China. Image via The Art Newspaper (www.theartnewspaper.com)

I’m sure I’ve used that headline before. Actually, I know I have. But it’s too good to resist. Besides which – it was two years ago, and more of a subheading than a headline.

Anyway, another to add to my ongoing file of copyright/authorship conundrums… (a couple more linked here and here).

According to The Art Newspaper (TAN), Italian artist Claudio Capotondi has made inroads into the Chinese art world. A version of the work he produced in 1978, Sferosnodo, was selected for permanent display at the front of a station in the city of Kunshan, China.

The only catch? Capotondi had nothing to do with the creation of the sculpture on display in China. It is much larger than the artist’s own work, which he first made in bronze in 1978, and again in marble in  1983. He also had no idea the gargantuan version was being made.

But now here’s the mind-bending thing. Think about ‘authorship’ and what you think it means in the context of fine art. Well, Capotondi is now campaigning to have the new version attributed to him. Although I had a look, and it appears that his website is now offline, according to TAN, Capotondi lists the sculpture as his own on his site. He has also said that he admires the work. “There are excellent craftsmen over there. It is a complex structure and the copy is much bigger than my original.”

So according to this, blatant plagiarism can result in a work of art for which an artist can claim authorship, even if he or she had no idea it was being made, far less any involvement with its creation.

OK. So, does that mean that Gucci is going to claim authorship for the dodgy knock-off handbags sold in the streets? Unlikely, because they wouldn’t want to acknowledge such shoddy craftsmanship. Not to mention, their trade relies on the premise of ‘exclusivity’. Does that mean artists will claim authorship of a stolen design only if the object produced measures up to their exacting standards? And does that mean that if I were to whip up a completely excellent Damian Hirst, that he would claim authorship, and I’d be in possession of an original Damian Hirst, rather than a derivative Meaghan Wilson-Anastasios? Of course, there are laws in Australia and internationally that would make the latter scenario more complicated. But I’m talking theoretically.

Makes you think, doesn’t it?





Simon says? He’ll be on the art-side, looking in.

21 03 2013
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Image via 3aw.com.au

Ah, the Arts portfolio. Our problem child. Now left floundering, rudderless*, after Minister Simon Crean’s self-immolation this afternoon.

Was it something we said?

* Why did I not see any ‘Rudd-erless’ headlines after Kevin got the old heave-ho? Such an easy get.





Priscilla, Queen of the Desart

20 03 2013
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Still from ‘Priscilla Queen of the Desert’ (image via rockymusic.org)

A little quiet on the Western Front this week, I’m afraid, as I prepare for my keynote at Desart’s annual conference in Alice Springs next week. Under consideration will be all things Aboriginal art market-related.

I promise to update as soon as possible after I get back. Yes, I could do something on my iThing while I’m up there, but I plan to spend as little time working on the small screen as possible.